Aaron, Rosanna and Zuko
       
     
Counterpoint
       
     
Adagio
       
     
Ellipses
       
     
Alexander
       
     
Coloratura
       
     
Neil DeGrasse Tyson
       
     
Bob Zink and Frankie
       
     
The Archivist
       
     
Edward O. Wilson
       
     
I. Bohorquez
       
     
Arpeggio
       
     
Clay Wollney and a Turtle
       
     
Summer Harvest
       
     
Dick Buegler at Cropsey's View
       
     
Martha Listens
       
     
The Restorers
       
     
Diane Ackerman
       
     
Analise
       
     
Ralph Lamberti - Staten Island BP
       
     
RJ Lamberti
       
     
Nora and her Hummingbird
       
     
Winter Explorers
       
     
Nora and Elizabeth (Sugar and Spice)
       
     
A. Hervold
       
     
Saul Bellow
       
     
Alex and Faith
       
     
Elizabeth
       
     
Cassius
       
     
Contrapusto, Chiaroscuro, Tropicana
       
     
K. Murray
       
     
The Firefighter
       
     
Ian - 14 months
       
     
Ian - Two and a Half
       
     
Practice
       
     
Self Portrait 2012
       
     
The Middletons
       
     
Ian at Eighteen
       
     
Janice and Gus
       
     
Jackie
       
     
Tegla Loroupe
       
     
Kevin M
       
     
Peter M.
       
     
Nat and Cha
       
     
Abigail
       
     
Ian - 2000
       
     
Nora - 1999
       
     
Ted Corbitt
       
     
L. Rodriguez  - Distance Runner
       
     
Self Portrait - 1998
       
     
Cromwell Center
       
     
Self Portrait with Ian and Nora
       
     
Midsummer Night Meet
       
     
Sunday Run
       
     
Brian
       
     
Brooke and Brenda
       
     
Dr. Marlene Springer
       
     
DRS RICHARD and CARIN GUARASCI
       
     
Aaron, Rosanna and Zuko
       
     
Aaron, Rosanna and Zuko


oil on board 24.5" x 18"

Newly married Brooklyn couple and their dog

Counterpoint
       
     
Counterpoint

Counterpoint - oil on board 24" x 24"

from the External Forces series funded by a NYSCA grant and exhibited through NYC Parks

Dancers Laura Neese and Melissa West move through an abandoned lot in Graham Beach where a Hurricane Sandy home once stood.

from the External Forces series funded by a NYSCA grant and exhibited through NYC Parks

External Forces is a series of oil paintings depicting artists in situ at various Staten Island locations...specifically preserved areas ( Greenbelt, Bluebelt and parklands)

These paintings are acknowledgement of the inspiration provided to these artists by their environment with a nod to the significance, import of conservation and land preservation for all strata of the society

Adagio
       
     
Adagio

oil on board 18" x 24"

Musician/Composer/Singer Janine Otis at Snug Harbor Cultural Center's Tuscan Garden

from the External Forces series funded by a NYSCA grant and exhibited through NYC Parks

 

External Forces is a series of oil paintings depicting artists in situ at various Staten Island locations...specifically preserved areas ( Greenbelt, Bluebelt and parklands)

These paintings are acknowledgement of the inspiration provided to these artists by their environment with a nod to the significance, import of conservation and land preservation for all strata of the society

Ellipses
       
     
Ellipses

Ellipses - oil on board 18" x 24"

Poet Dr. Marguerite Maria Rivas at Great Kills Beach

from the External Forces series funded by a NYSCA grant and exhibited through NYC Parks

 

External Forces is a series of oil paintings depicting artists in situ at various Staten Island locations...specifically preserved areas ( Greenbelt, Bluebelt and parklands)

These paintings are acknowledgement of the inspiration provided to these artists by their environment with a nod to the significance, import of conservation and land preservation for all strata of the society

Alexander
       
     
Alexander

oil on board - 25” x 24”

I've known Alexander since he was a 18 months old, now 8 years. His mother and father are my friends Linda and Michael, the latter of whom is my documentary partner.

Their contemplative, observant and imaginative son has made a fine choice of parents, who supplied some great genes from nearly every continent:
Puerto Rico, Africa, India, India, Great Britain, Yemen, France and Spain..

collection of Michael and Linda Bailey-McWeeney

Coloratura
       
     
Coloratura

Coloratura - oil on board 20" x 24"

Musicians play in the Greenbelt

from the External Forces series funded by a NYSCA grant and exhibited through NYC Parks

External Forces is a series of oil paintings depicting artists in situ at various Staten Island locations...specifically preserved areas ( Greenbelt, Bluebelt and parklands)

These paintings are acknowledgement of the inspiration provided to these artists by their environment with a nod to the significance, import of conservation and land preservation for all strata of the society

Neil DeGrasse Tyson
       
     
Neil DeGrasse Tyson

Neil DeGrasse Tyson- oil on canvas 40" x 49"

collection of The National Air and Space Museum

BIOPHILES | SCIENTISTS

The sciences are solitary, focused pursuits. The decision to immerse oneself in these fields is an outgrowth of human spirit and acute interest in the workings of our universe.

My images aim to uncap the philosophies and worth of those who quietly study the underpinnings of our world, bringing more of it to us. While creating these portraits I have met astoundingly dedicated, knowledgeable people with endless drive, perseverance and intelligence: botanists who promote native plant restoration, scholars in astrophysics, ornithology, herpetology, entomology, pollution control specialists and educators, one of whom writes a popular children's science column. Some are ferocious activists; many have helped create legislation to prevent further habitat destruction... my sister Elizabeth, an aquatic toxicologist, among them.

Many scientists and environmentalists are compelling writers and able draftsmen, using these skills to document and communicate. As an avid reader of their articles and books, I'm moved by the enthusiasm I find and the great writing itself.

In his "biophilia" hypothesis, internationally esteemed sociobiologist Edward O. Wilson defines biophilia as "the urge to affiliate with other forms of life". He and his colleagues offer that humans have an innate affinity for the natural world, probably a biologically based need integral to our development as individuals.

The first world I knew, Staten Island in the 1960's, harbored such marvels as redwing blackbirds, cardinals, snow, raspberries, blackberries, spider webs, bullfrogs, cicadas, shooting stars, possum, Queen Anne's Lace and milkweed. Walking through the woods, my mother could name every plant, bird, tree and flower. Occasionally, on warm nights we would go out into the back yard and look at the constellations. It didn't bother me that Orion's dots didn't connect to make him look even vaguely like a hunter, or that Sirius bore little resemblance to a dog. I knew better than to expect celestial cartoons; the mystery and math of a midnight sky was enough, but I let my mother trace the lines from star to star, pointing.

The reportage of writing and drawing were natural inclinations. At twelve I began making the hour and forty minute commute into Manhattan from Staten Island's south shore to attend New York City's High School of Art and Design. Immersed in painting, sketching, learning about art and art history, the parameters of my adolescents' molten planet became more viable as my commitment solidified. I brought my French easel on long bicycle trips to paint in the overbearing sun, and to isolated deteriorating boardwalks in February... the sensory additives of weather were my accomplices. Structure and reason emerged by brushstroke.

The cerebral isometrics of painting have been part of my regular routine for much of my life. By addressing the tenacity and generous gifts brought by those in the sciences, I take both dialogues to canvas.

http://www.haydenplanetarium.org/tyson/profile/portraits

 

Bob Zink and Frankie
       
     
Bob Zink and Frankie

charcoal and conte crayon on rag paper 32" x 42"

..the late Bob Zink, an extraordinarily dedicated licensed wildlife rehabilitator with one of his rescued raccoons, Frankie.

private collection NYC

The Archivist
       
     
The Archivist

oil on board 24" x 24"

EdJohnson - Science curator at the Staten Island Museum

collection - Staten Island Museum

 

BIOPHILES | SCIENTISTS

The sciences are solitary, focused pursuits. The decision to immerse oneself in these fields is an outgrowth of human spirit and acute interest in the workings of our universe.

 

My images aim to uncap the philosophies and worth of those who quietly study the underpinnings of our world, bringing more of it to us. While creating these portraits I have met astoundingly dedicated, knowledgeable people with endless drive, perseverance and intelligence: botanists who promote native plant restoration, scholars in astrophysics, ornithology, herpetology, entomology, pollution control specialists and educators, one of whom writes a popular children's science column. Some are ferocious activists; many have helped create legislation to prevent further habitat destruction... my sister Elizabeth, an aquatic toxicologist, among them.

 

Many scientists and environmentalists are compelling writers and able draftsmen, using these skills to document and communicate. As an avid reader of their articles and books, I'm moved by the enthusiasm I find and the great writing itself.

 

In his "biophilia" hypothesis, internationally esteemed sociobiologist Edward O. Wilson defines biophilia as "the urge to affiliate with other forms of life". He and his colleagues offer that humans have an innate affinity for the natural world, probably a biologically based need integral to our development as individuals.

 

The first world I knew, Staten Island in the 1960's, harbored such marvels as redwing blackbirds, cardinals, snow, raspberries, blackberries, spider webs, bullfrogs, cicadas, shooting stars, possum, Queen Anne's Lace and milkweed. Walking through the woods, my mother could name every plant, bird, tree and flower. Occasionally, on warm nights we would go out into the back yard and look at the constellations. It didn't bother me that Orion's dots didn't connect to make him look even vaguely like a hunter, or that Sirius bore little resemblance to a dog. I knew better than to expect celestial cartoons; the mystery and math of a midnight sky was enough, but I let my mother trace the lines from star to star, pointing.

 

The reportage of writing and drawing were natural inclinations. At twelve I began making the hour and forty minute commute into Manhattan from Staten Island's south shore to attend New York City's High School of Art and Design. Immersed in painting, sketching, learning about art and art history, the parameters of my adolescents' molten planet became more viable as my commitment solidified. I brought my French easel on long bicycle trips to paint in the overbearing sun, and to isolated deteriorating boardwalks in February... the sensory additives of weather were my accomplices. Structure and reason emerged by brushstroke.

The cerebral isometrics of painting have been part of my regular routine for much of my life. By addressing the tenacity and generous gifts brought by those in the sciences, I take both dialogues to canvas.

Edward O. Wilson
       
     
Edward O. Wilson

oil on canvas 42" x 42"

collection of University of Alabama via Harvard University

BIOPHILES | SCIENTISTS

The sciences are solitary, focused pursuits. The decision to immerse oneself in these fields is an outgrowth of human spirit and acute interest in the workings of our universe.

I. Bohorquez
       
     
I. Bohorquez

oil on canvas 28" x 36"

Irma Bohorquez, Oxford educated entomologist is from Mexico City. She is a Mexican folklorist and photographer, exhibiting throughout the US.

collection of Jennifer Hall Lee

Arpeggio
       
     
Arpeggio

oil on board 18" x 24"

Seun Bond - jazz sax player from Nigeria practices in Silver Lake Park

from the External Forces series funded by a NYSCA grant and exhibited through NYC Parks

External Forces is a series of oil paintings depicting artists in situ at various Staten Island locations...specifically preserved areas ( Greenbelt, Bluebelt and parklands)

These paintings are acknowledgement of the inspiration provided to these artists by their environment with a nod to the significance, import of conservation and land preservation for all strata of the society

Clay Wollney and a Turtle
       
     
Clay Wollney and a Turtle

oil on canvas 26” x 34”

BIOPHILES | SCIENTISTS

The sciences are solitary, focused pursuits. The decision to immerse oneself in these fields is an outgrowth of human spirit and acute interest in the workings of our universe.

My images aim to uncap the philosophies and worth of those who quietly study the underpinnings of our world, bringing more of it to us. While creating these portraits I have met astoundingly dedicated, knowledgeable people with endless drive, perseverance and intelligence: botanists who promote native plant restoration, scholars in astrophysics, ornithology, herpetology, entomology, pollution control specialists and educators, one of whom writes a popular children's science column. Some are ferocious activists; many have helped create legislation to prevent further habitat destruction... my sister Elizabeth, an aquatic toxicologist, among them.

Many scientists and environmentalists are compelling writers and able draftsmen, using these skills to document and communicate. As an avid reader of their articles and books, I'm moved by the enthusiasm I find and the great writing itself.

In his "biophilia" hypothesis, internationally esteemed sociobiologist Edward O. Wilson defines biophilia as "the urge to affiliate with other forms of life". He and his colleagues offer that humans have an innate affinity for the natural world, probably a biologically based need integral to our development as individuals.

The first world I knew, Staten Island in the 1960's, harbored such marvels as redwing blackbirds, cardinals, snow, raspberries, blackberries, spider webs, bullfrogs, cicadas, shooting stars, possum, Queen Anne's Lace and milkweed. Walking through the woods, my mother could name every plant, bird, tree and flower. Occasionally, on warm nights we would go out into the back yard and look at the constellations. It didn't bother me that Orion's dots didn't connect to make him look even vaguely like a hunter, or that Sirius bore little resemblance to a dog. I knew better than to expect celestial cartoons; the mystery and math of a midnight sky was enough, but I let my mother trace the lines from star to star, pointing.

The reportage of writing and drawing were natural inclinations. At twelve I began making the hour and forty minute commute into Manhattan from Staten Island's south shore to attend New York City's High School of Art and Design. Immersed in painting, sketching, learning about art and art history, the parameters of my adolescents' molten planet became more viable as my commitment solidified. I brought my French easel on long bicycle trips to paint in the overbearing sun, and to isolated deteriorating boardwalks in February... the sensory additives of weather were my accomplices. Structure and reason emerged by brushstroke.

The cerebral isometrics of painting have been part of my regular routine for much of my life. By addressing the tenacity and generous gifts brought by those in the sciences, I take both dialogues to canvas.

Summer Harvest
       
     
Summer Harvest

Summer Harvest - oil on board 24" x 24"

Jay Weichun, filmmaker, environmental activist, guerrilla gardener with his wife Joann and children

from the External Forces series funded by a NYSCA grant and exhibited through NYC Parks

External Forces is a series of oil paintings depicting artists in situ at various Staten Island locations...specifically preserved areas ( Greenbelt, Bluebelt and parklands)

These paintings are acknowledgement of the inspiration provided to these artists by their environment with a nod to the significance, import of conservation and land preservation for all strata of the society

Dick Buegler at Cropsey's View
       
     
Dick Buegler at Cropsey's View

oil on canvas - 26" x 28"

Dick Buegler is a dedicated, effective conservationist, fierce and smart. He and the Protectors of Pine Oak Woods are largely responsible for the saving of 2800 acres of urban wilderness, the StatenIsland Greenbelt.

BIOPHILES | SCIENTISTS

The sciences are solitary, focused pursuits. The decision to immerse oneself in these fields is an outgrowth of human spirit and acute interest in the workings of our universe.

My images aim to uncap the philosophies and worth of those who quietly study the underpinnings of our world, bringing more of it to us. While creating these portraits I have met astoundingly dedicated, knowledgeable people with endless drive, perseverance and intelligence: botanists who promote native plant restoration, scholars in astrophysics, ornithology, herpetology, entomology, pollution control specialists and educators, one of whom writes a popular children's science column. Some are ferocious activists; many have helped create legislation to prevent further habitat destruction... my sister Elizabeth, an aquatic toxicologist, among them.

Many scientists and environmentalists are compelling writers and able draftsmen, using these skills to document and communicate. As an avid reader of their articles and books, I'm moved by the enthusiasm I find and the great writing itself.

In his "biophilia" hypothesis, internationally esteemed sociobiologist Edward O. Wilson defines biophilia as "the urge to affiliate with other forms of life". He and his colleagues offer that humans have an innate affinity for the natural world, probably a biologically based need integral to our development as individuals.

The first world I knew, Staten Island in the 1960's, harbored such marvels as redwing blackbirds, cardinals, snow, raspberries, blackberries, spider webs, bullfrogs, cicadas, shooting stars, possum, Queen Anne's Lace and milkweed. Walking through the woods, my mother could name every plant, bird, tree and flower. Occasionally, on warm nights we would go out into the back yard and look at the constellations. It didn't bother me that Orion's dots didn't connect to make him look even vaguely like a hunter, or that Sirius bore little resemblance to a dog. I knew better than to expect celestial cartoons; the mystery and math of a midnight sky was enough, but I let my mother trace the lines from star to star, pointing.

The reportage of writing and drawing were natural inclinations. At twelve I began making the hour and forty minute commute into Manhattan from Staten Island's south shore to attend New York City's High School of Art and Design. Immersed in painting, sketching, learning about art and art history, the parameters of my adolescents' molten planet became more viable as my commitment solidified. I brought my French easel on long bicycle trips to paint in the overbearing sun, and to isolated deteriorating boardwalks in February... the sensory additives of weather were my accomplices. Structure and reason emerged by brushstroke.

The cerebral isometrics of painting have been part of my regular routine for much of my life. By addressing the tenacity and generous gifts brought by those in the sciences, I take both dialogues to canvas.

Martha Listens
       
     
Martha Listens

oil on canvas 28" x 48" 

Martha Hiatt, director of marine mammals for the New York Aquarium, listens to Marina, a beluga whale

BIOPHILES | SCIENTISTS

The sciences are solitary, focused pursuits. The decision to immerse oneself in these fields is an outgrowth of human spirit and acute interest in the workings of our universe.

 

My images aim to uncap the philosophies and worth of those who quietly study the underpinnings of our world, bringing more of it to us. While creating these portraits I have met astoundingly dedicated, knowledgeable people with endless drive, perseverance and intelligence: botanists who promote native plant restoration, scholars in astrophysics, ornithology, herpetology, entomology, pollution control specialists and educators, one of whom writes a popular children's science column. Some are ferocious activists; many have helped create legislation to prevent further habitat destruction... my sister Elizabeth, an aquatic toxicologist, among them.

 

Many scientists and environmentalists are compelling writers and able draftsmen, using these skills to document and communicate. As an avid reader of their articles and books, I'm moved by the enthusiasm I find and the great writing itself.

 

In his "biophilia" hypothesis, internationally esteemed sociobiologist Edward O. Wilson defines biophilia as "the urge to affiliate with other forms of life". He and his colleagues offer that humans have an innate affinity for the natural world, probably a biologically based need integral to our development as individuals.

 

The first world I knew, Staten Island in the 1960's, harbored such marvels as redwing blackbirds, cardinals, snow, raspberries, blackberries, spider webs, bullfrogs, cicadas, shooting stars, possum, Queen Anne's Lace and milkweed. Walking through the woods, my mother could name every plant, bird, tree and flower. Occasionally, on warm nights we would go out into the back yard and look at the constellations. It didn't bother me that Orion's dots didn't connect to make him look even vaguely like a hunter, or that Sirius bore little resemblance to a dog. I knew better than to expect celestial cartoons; the mystery and math of a midnight sky was enough, but I let my mother trace the lines from star to star, pointing.

 

The reportage of writing and drawing were natural inclinations. At twelve I began making the hour and forty minute commute into Manhattan from Staten Island's south shore to attend New York City's High School of Art and Design. Immersed in painting, sketching, learning about art and art history, the parameters of my adolescents' molten planet became more viable as my commitment solidified. I brought my French easel on long bicycle trips to paint in the overbearing sun, and to isolated deteriorating boardwalks in February... the sensory additives of weather were my accomplices. Structure and reason emerged by brushstroke.

The cerebral isometrics of painting have been part of my regular routine for much of my life. By addressing the tenacity and generous gifts brought by those in the sciences, I take both dialogues to canvas.

The Restorers
       
     
The Restorers

oil on canvas 40" x 48"

These three women are experts at identify and nurturing native seeds for restoration projects throughout NYC

collection of NYC Parks Department

Diane Ackerman
       
     
Diane Ackerman

oil on canvas 40” x 32”

The author, Diane Ackerman in her Ithaca, NY backyard

Analise
       
     
Analise

oil on board 22" x 24"

Analise wanted to pose in her Princess Elsa dress. Perfect!

private collection NYC

Ralph Lamberti - Staten Island BP
       
     
Ralph Lamberti - Staten Island BP

oil on canvas 36" x 48"

RJ Lamberti
       
     
RJ Lamberti

oil on board 22" x 28"

private collection

Nora and her Hummingbird
       
     
Nora and her Hummingbird

oil on board - 24” x 18”

A young woman plays guitar in the natural light of her instrument strewn living room.

Winter Explorers
       
     
Winter Explorers

oil on board 24" x 24"

Wildlife guide and naturalist, Raymond M. leads a group of children through a local woodland area.

 

collection of Staten Island Museum

BIOPHILES | SCIENTISTS

The sciences are solitary, focused pursuits. The decision to immerse oneself in these fields is an outgrowth of human spirit and acute interest in the workings of our universe.

 

My images aim to uncap the philosophies and worth of those who quietly study the underpinnings of our world, bringing more of it to us. While creating these portraits I have met astoundingly dedicated, knowledgeable people with endless drive, perseverance and intelligence: botanists who promote native plant restoration, scholars in astrophysics, ornithology, herpetology, entomology, pollution control specialists and educators, one of whom writes a popular children's science column. Some are ferocious activists; many have helped create legislation to prevent further habitat destruction... my sister Elizabeth, an aquatic toxicologist, among them.

 

Many scientists and environmentalists are compelling writers and able draftsmen, using these skills to document and communicate. As an avid reader of their articles and books, I'm moved by the enthusiasm I find and the great writing itself.

 

In his "biophilia" hypothesis, internationally esteemed sociobiologist Edward O. Wilson defines biophilia as "the urge to affiliate with other forms of life". He and his colleagues offer that humans have an innate affinity for the natural world, probably a biologically based need integral to our development as individuals.

 

The first world I knew, Staten Island in the 1960's, harbored such marvels as redwing blackbirds, cardinals, snow, raspberries, blackberries, spider webs, bullfrogs, cicadas, shooting stars, possum, Queen Anne's Lace and milkweed. Walking through the woods, my mother could name every plant, bird, tree and flower. Occasionally, on warm nights we would go out into the back yard and look at the constellations. It didn't bother me that Orion's dots didn't connect to make him look even vaguely like a hunter, or that Sirius bore little resemblance to a dog. I knew better than to expect celestial cartoons; the mystery and math of a midnight sky was enough, but I let my mother trace the lines from star to star, pointing.

 

The reportage of writing and drawing were natural inclinations. At twelve I began making the hour and forty minute commute into Manhattan from Staten Island's south shore to attend New York City's High School of Art and Design. Immersed in painting, sketching, learning about art and art history, the parameters of my adolescents' molten planet became more viable as my commitment solidified. I brought my French easel on long bicycle trips to paint in the overbearing sun, and to isolated deteriorating boardwalks in February... the sensory additives of weather were my accomplices. Structure and reason emerged by brushstroke.

The cerebral isometrics of painting have been part of my regular routine for much of my life. By addressing the tenacity and generous gifts brought by those in the sciences, I take both dialogues to canvas.

Nora and Elizabeth (Sugar and Spice)
       
     
Nora and Elizabeth (Sugar and Spice)

oil on canvas 32” x 36”

Nora Asher and her aunt, Elizabeth Yuster (aquatic toxicologist , herpetologist) handle several of Elizabeth's pets

BIOPHILES | SCIENTISTS

The sciences are solitary, focused pursuits. The decision to immerse oneself in these fields is an outgrowth of human spirit and acute interest in the workings of our universe.

My images aim to uncap the philosophies and worth of those who quietly study the underpinnings of our world, bringing more of it to us. While creating these portraits I have met astoundingly dedicated, knowledgeable people with endless drive, perseverance and intelligence: botanists who promote native plant restoration, scholars in astrophysics, ornithology, herpetology, entomology, pollution control specialists and educators, one of whom writes a popular children's science column. Some are ferocious activists; many have helped create legislation to prevent further habitat destruction... my sister Elizabeth, an aquatic toxicologist, among them.

Many scientists and environmentalists are compelling writers and able draftsmen, using these skills to document and communicate. As an avid reader of their articles and books, I'm moved by the enthusiasm I find and the great writing itself.

In his "biophilia" hypothesis, internationally esteemed sociobiologist Edward O. Wilson defines biophilia as "the urge to affiliate with other forms of life". He and his colleagues offer that humans have an innate affinity for the natural world, probably a biologically based need integral to our development as individuals.

The first world I knew, Staten Island in the 1960's, harbored such marvels as redwing blackbirds, cardinals, snow, raspberries, blackberries, spider webs, bullfrogs, cicadas, shooting stars, possum, Queen Anne's Lace and milkweed. Walking through the woods, my mother could name every plant, bird, tree and flower. Occasionally, on warm nights we would go out into the back yard and look at the constellations. It didn't bother me that Orion's dots didn't connect to make him look even vaguely like a hunter, or that Sirius bore little resemblance to a dog. I knew better than to expect celestial cartoons; the mystery and math of a midnight sky was enough, but I let my mother trace the lines from star to star, pointing.

The reportage of writing and drawing were natural inclinations. At twelve I began making the hour and forty minute commute into Manhattan from Staten Island's south shore to attend New York City's High School of Art and Design. Immersed in painting, sketching, learning about art and art history, the parameters of my adolescents' molten planet became more viable as my commitment solidified. I brought my French easel on long bicycle trips to paint in the overbearing sun, and to isolated deteriorating boardwalks in February... the sensory additives of weather were my accomplices. Structure and reason emerged by brushstroke.

The cerebral isometrics of painting have been part of my regular routine for much of my life. By addressing the tenacity and generous gifts brought by those in the sciences, I take both dialogues to canvas.

A. Hervold
       
     
A. Hervold

oil on board 25" x 26"

Portrait of A. Hervold, set builder/designer for the NYC Metropolitan Opera

 

private collection NYC

Saul Bellow
       
     
Saul Bellow

oil on canvas 40" x 40"

Painting of Saul Bellow at his home in Vermont...now in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, purchased in 1997

an article I wrote about the experience of painting my favorite author:

http://forward.com/culture/books/308947/painting-saul-bellow/

Alex and Faith
       
     
Alex and Faith

oil on canvas 48” x 42”

My sister Alexandra and her wife, Faith on the porch of their Vermont home

collection of Faith Tempest and Alexandra Yuster UK/Vt

Elizabeth
       
     
Elizabeth

oil on canvas 34" x 42"

 

My sister Elizabeth at about age twenty four, standing on the stairway of Snug Harbor Cultural Center on Staten Island where I had a studio for many years.

Cassius
       
     
Cassius

oil on board 12" x 12"

 

collection of Rachel Somma Devlin and Kevin Devlin  NYC

Contrapusto, Chiaroscuro, Tropicana
       
     
Contrapusto, Chiaroscuro, Tropicana

oil on canvas - 40" x 66"

This image was intended as a gently humorous, updated version of the figure in classical art.
The elements of light illuminating the shadowed ( chiaroscuro) form, and the weight of the figure on one leg, to give a more graceful posture (contrapusto) ..plus the modern American images of white briefs and Tropicana orange juice complete the picture.

K. Murray
       
     
K. Murray

oil on board 24" x 24"

 

NYFD firefighter...father, son, husband and brother

 

private collection NYC

The Firefighter
       
     
The Firefighter

oil on canvas 40" x72"

Ian - 14 months
       
     
Ian - 14 months

oil on board 24” x 20”

The intensity of a baby examining a book was the most compelling component for me, especially as he’s our son.

Ian - Two and a Half
       
     
Ian - Two and a Half

oil on canvas 18” x 26”

Practice
       
     
Practice

oil on board 12” x 18”

Ian at eight with an alto saxophone

Self Portrait 2012
       
     
Self Portrait 2012

oil on board 24” x 24”

The Middletons
       
     
The Middletons

oil on board 24" x 24" 

Ian at Eighteen
       
     
Ian at Eighteen

oil on board 18” x 24” 2008

Ian with his brand new tattoo of Curious George

Janice and Gus
       
     
Janice and Gus

oil on canvas - 24" x 30"

collection of Mr. and Mrs. Ellison

Jackie
       
     
Jackie

oil on canvas 24” x 24”

Tegla Loroupe
       
     
Tegla Loroupe

oil on canvas 36" x 42"

 

Tegla Loroupe, founder and director of Tegla Loroupe Peace Foundation, Olympic marathon and half marathon champion

 

collection of The Peace Foundation, Kenya

Kevin M
       
     
Kevin M

18" x 24" oil on board

NYC Firefighter who upon retiring became a history professor, outdoor adventurer, mountain climber

Peter M.
       
     
Peter M.

oil on board 24" x 24"

Portrait of a history scholar, humanitarian, lover of arts & culture, traveler and Peace Corps (Chile) veteran.

 

private collection NYC

Nat and Cha
       
     
Nat and Cha

108" x 144" (tryptich) oil on linen

 

Natayada and Luecha used this painting as the image for their wedding invitation in 2012 ..a lavish, glorious event held in Chang Mai, Thailand. (yes..of course I went!) 

The painting hangs in Nat's home on his family's compound in Bangkok. They have a place in NYC...not far from from the depicted scene

Abigail
       
     
Abigail

oil on board 16" x 17"

After having done a number of loose landscapes in fairly rapid succession, I welcomed the different skill set required to so carefully examine the subtle, translucent features and burgeoning spirit of a little girl barely over a year and a half old.

The most delightful moment was having her accompany her parents to the studio so they could see the progress. Abby recognized herself, grinning and pointing the second she was brought in front of the easel. A new experience for both of us!

Ian - 2000
       
     
Ian - 2000

oil on canvas 30” x 34”

Nora - 1999
       
     
Nora - 1999

oil on board 12” x 18”

Nora in a handstand. Twelve years of competitive gymnastics followed

Ted Corbitt
       
     
Ted Corbitt

oil on canvas - 40" x 40"

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/13/sports/othersports/13corbitt.html

 

  collection of New York Armory Track:

       New York City Mararhon Exhibit

 

 

 

 

 

L. Rodriguez  - Distance Runner
       
     
L. Rodriguez - Distance Runner

 

oil on canvas 48" x 48"

http://www.runnersworld.com/web-exclusive/running-in-art/slide/12


Every running community has its legends and heroes...the ones who go farthest or fastest, have lasted the longest as competitors, come back from the worst injuries or make the most of what they have as athletes. These icons of spirit become local property, instilling pride as if they were historical landmarks. 

A Comrades Ultra marathon veteran and Viet Nam veteran as well, Louis Rodriguez is part of the natural landscape - he can almost always be seen on the horizon at various hours, moving evenly along the shoulder of the road anywhere within a ten mile radius of his 100 mile per week route. Raised in East Harlem by struggling Puerto Rican parents, his focus on success for the next generation meant suppressing a draw to the arts. In a newspaper interview response to the question, “Why do you run?”, he is quoted: 

“My daily runs are performances that I choreograph from within as I move through space and time. As the dancer becomes the dance, the runner becomes the run, my stage awaits, where I become one” 


In August of 2001, this 55 year old aircraft mechanic began to run for many lives. When his long time running partner was diagnosed with breast cancer, he decided to do something in support of her and all women. Wearing a singlet inscribed This I Do For You he ran from Staten Island, New York to Miami, Florida, raising funds for breast cancer education and research. He ran over thirty-five miles a day for 38 consecutive days, handing out leaflets in every town.

Self Portrait - 1998
       
     
Self Portrait - 1998

oil on board - 12” x 15

Cromwell Center
       
     
Cromwell Center

oil on canvas

New York City public gym and recreation center circa 1990

Self Portrait with Ian and Nora
       
     
Self Portrait with Ian and Nora

oil on canvas 40" x 54"

collection of the artist

Midsummer Night Meet
       
     
Midsummer Night Meet

oil on canvas 42" x 48"

 

A running club listens to stats noted by their coach on a summer evening

Sunday Run
       
     
Sunday Run

oil on canvas 30" x 24"

 

Three seasoned distance runners relax in the cool April morning after their Sunday long run.

Brian
       
     
Brian

oil on board 18" x 18"

A quiet man - free of so many of the superficial weights that most people have. He's a nurse...and had done a stint in Iraq providing medical care. I only knew this after all this time by asking.

collection of Brian Wright

Brooke and Brenda
       
     
Brooke and Brenda

oil on board 20" x 24"

A family friend of Brenda's commissioned this as a generous gift. She may have been a bit less than enthusiastic, but graciously accepted. The friend was unaware that Brenda and I were already friends, running into each other periodically in our favorite park. This enabled a comfortable collaboration between us in choosing the tenor of the image...and we were both very much in agreement about including Brooke, Brenda's high energy Blue Weimaraner.

Brenda and Alf Hervold

Dr. Marlene Springer
       
     
Dr. Marlene Springer

oil on canvas 36" x 40"


President
College of Staten Island
1994 - 2007

Dr. Springer led the College of Staten Island from 1994 until her retirement in 2007. Academic programs at the College of Staten Island flourished under Dr. Springer.

Among her achievements was the creation of the Department of Media Culture, a long list of new degree programs such as the MA in History and the opening of the CSI High School for International Studies.

The Concert Hall in the CSI Center for the Arts has been named in her honor.

DRS RICHARD and CARIN GUARASCI
       
     
DRS RICHARD and CARIN GUARASCI

oil on canvas 40” x 48”

Dr. Richard Guarasci has been president of Wagner College ( State Island, NYC) for 21 years. His wife Carin was an education professor in the same institution.